How to Approach a Loved One About Alcohol Addiction Counseling

If you’re worried about the amount of alcohol a loved one is consuming, and how it’s affecting them, you may be trying to figure out how best to reach out. It can be extremely difficult to talk to someone about their use of alcohol when you don't know how they will react. 

When you’re ready to reach out, having a plan in place to help can increase the chances of their success in overcoming alcohol addiction.

Dr. Lori Scott has years of experience treating patients via videoconference from her practice in Kinston, North Carolina, using the Sinclair Method. This combination of counseling and non-addictive prescription medication can help your loved one find their way back from alcohol dependency and enjoy a full, rich life unencumbered by alcohol addiction. 

Getting ready to talk to a loved one about alcohol use

Before talking to a person with alcohol issues about their dependency, it's best to gain as much knowledge about alcoholism in general and their problems in particular as possible. 

Once you've provided yourself with facts and understanding, choose your time wisely. It's best not to try to "confront" your loved one while they’re already drinking. Instead, look for a relaxed moment when you can sit down and talk in a calm, natural manner.

Expect denial, pushback, and even anger. A person who abuses alcohol can be unaware of how heavily it is affecting their life and the lives of those around them. Be patient and stay calm. It may take several talks until what you’re saying breaks through to them.

Have a plan ready to go for when your loved one finally admits they have a problem and says they need help. You can provide them with Dr. Scott's number and have them call immediately for an appointment. 

The Sinclair Method

The Sinclair Method has proven extremely successful in helping people to stop drinking. Dr. Scott will make herself available for counseling sessions through a video call so your loved one can feel comfortable and safe. She will also prescribe naltrexone, a drug that is non-addictive and removes the pleasure usually obtained from drinking alcohol.

As your loved one works through counseling and takes naltrexone each time they drink, they will find that alcohol no longer produces the same pleasant effects that it used to. This will lead to a natural tendency to drink less, and they can slowly reduce their alcohol intake.

You can be there to support your friend or family member as they go through the journey of overcoming their alcohol dependency. However, only they can decide when they’re ready to seek help. 

When they do, you can point them to Dr. Scott and have them call 252-238-7079 or book their first video session online. They can also send a message to Dr. Scott here on the practice’s website.

 

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